Available in the Shop: Our Favourite Cartiers from Watchfinder & Co.

Ross Povey examines the latest selection of Cartier watches from Watchfinder & Co.

There are many watch brands that are hot at the moment, but one particular house has enjoyed a steep trajectory over the past few years becoming one of the most talked about in both modern and vintage collecting circles. That brand is Cartier and today we are sharing a new selection of watches from our partnership with Watchfinder that takes in three of the brand’s most iconic lines; the Santos Galbee, Pasha and Tank Solo.

The Santos Galbee

Ok, let’s get this out of the way so there’s no confusion. A Cartier Santos, or Santos de Cartier, is a watch on a bracelet featuring screws on both its bezel and its bracelet. While it was clearly derived from the Cartier Santos-Dumont — the very first known luxury men’s wristwatch designed for Alberto Santos-Dumont by his friend Louis —it was actually conceptualised by a legend in the watch industry named Alain-Dominique Perrin, Cartier’s CEO from 1975 to 1998. Understanding that he was at the helm of Cartier during a turbulent era beset by both the Quartz Crisis as well as the OPEC Oil Embargo and the global economic recession of 1973 to 1975, he knew he had to think out of the box.

    Riding on the massive hit represented by the Le Must de Cartier watches — the brand’s lower-priced diffusion line— launched the year before in 1977, he introduced a revolutionary new wristwatch named the Santos in 1978 with the objective to connect the design language of Cartier to a whole new generation. Perrin wanted to do something truly audacious in the context of Cartier’s history and that was to make a watch in steel. However, he always wanted the watch to allude to the grandeur of Cartier, and he understood that the modest yet strategically applied use of gold elements could both elevate the perceived value of the watch and also create a bold and easily identifiable visual signature. As such, he fixed a gold bezel to the watch contrasted by steel screws; and then, in a brilliant design stroke, used the inverse pairing of gold screws on the steel bracelet, and ushered in the era of the two-tone dress watch.

    Contributor

    Ross Povey

    Published

    July 2021

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