Pleasure / December 2019

How Chelsea Barracks raised the bar for urban living

The Rake recently took a spin around one of the most talked about (and coveted) neighbourhoods in the world. Welcome to Chelsea Barracks.

It's not often that you walk into a modern property development and are left speechless, but recently I found myself carrying my jaw around one of the most talked about real estate projects in the world. The development in question is Chelsea Barracks, the enormous 13-acre super-luxury vision of the Qatari Diar group, which finally welcomed the first of its new residents this month. From the purchase of the land - the site of a former army garrison - off The Ministry of Defence in 2007, the realisation of this colossal scheme comes after many a twist and turn, not least the great financial crisis, but make no mistake – walk along Chelsea's Pimlico Road today and you will be greeted with one of the most impressive contemporary luxury apartment developments in all of London. It seems the wait was worth it.

I was lucky enough to visit Whistler Square to interview Take That's lead, Gary Barlow, in September this year for The Rake's December issue. The shoot was held in one of the penthouse apartments; a sprawling six-bedroom duplex affording stunning 360-degree views of South West London, not least from the ensuite, floor-to-ceiling glass bathrooms. There were still elements to be added to or worked on, but the level of finishing was there to see. From the private lift, one steps into a vaulting atrium that with commanding artworks on the walls and incredible views of Chelsea and Belgravia. Elicyon, the interior design studio responsible for many of the residences and amenities spaces have done an excellent job honouring the heritage of the site, translating its spirit of legacy into rooms of great beauty and distinction. Weaving delicate military details, inspired by infantry uniforms and artillery into the design, many elements of the interiors subtly honour the heritage of the former Barracks.

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Ryan Thompson

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