Spring Tailoring Guide

The weather, dictated by the elements of climate change, throws up some barmy and broad events in spring, blighting one’s wardrobe predilections, but here, Aleks Cvetkovic expertly advises what to wear, to reduce your chances of getting caught out, whilst remaining impeccably stylish.

It’s a funny time of year to dress for, this. The majority of the fashion industry tends to encourage consumers to think of the seasons as binaries: freezing cold winter versus super-heated summer, with little regard for the months of the year where one’s wardrobe has to transition between the two.

Consequently, for many early spring is the most pleasurable season to live through and the trickiest to dress for; mild but often chilly, showery and with weather too unpredictable to leave the house without a coat in the mornings. Nevertheless, we are at the start of a three-to-four month period of things lightening up. This is the general principle you should apply to your wardrobe; we’re not talking cream linen and sky blue chambray just yet, but you can start to move from the dark, earthy colours and textures of winter towards a warmer, brighter appearance. Chocolate brown tailoring can give way to lightweight cotton separates in tobacco and tan, English worsted can soften into royal blue hopsack, and charcoal flannel can morph into dove grey fresco.

With this in mind, the one thing you should own if you don’t currently is what I call a ‘between-season’ navy blazer. Whether single-breasted, double-breasted, horn-buttoned or brass-buttoned, few pieces are more wearable, and as we enter spring-proper a softly structured blazer in a lightweight or high-twist worsted can replace the heavy serge equivalent in your wardrobe. Neapolitan tailor De Petrillo has plenty of blazers to choose from that’ll take you through spring and into summer, and this season’s Blue Virgin Wool Half-Lined Double-Breasted Jacket, finished with silver buttons and patch hip pockets, is the perfect place to start.

Published

March 2020

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