Winter Coats: Beat The Freeze in Style

It’s time to wheel in the big guns, and by that, we mean the heavier winter coats. From smart layering options to comfortable wrap coats and much more, there are many ways to keep warm, relaxed and elegant this season.

Gunter Sachs with wife Mirja Larsson in St. Moritz. (Photo by Rolls Press/Popperfoto via Getty Images/Getty Images).

Pondering the investment of a winter coat can cause agonizing dilemmas. It can leave you in a conundrum that lasts so long, the perennial daffodils have sprung; at which point you’ve already turned to lightweight jackets. In winter, spikey icicles dangle from the fountains in Trafalgar square, bitter gale force winds uproot old trees next to Victoria station, and snowfall masks London’s bridges in a thick white blanket. And remarkably the consensus is that London’s climate is the most lenient in Britain. The weather is considered to be the primary reason to invest in a winter coat, but with the tectonic shift away from formality – a refined coat, crafted by some of the most adept artisans from around the world can act as the fulcrum for whichever end of the formality spectrum you choose to dress. Unlike many other categories of apparel, an expertly crafted coat has boundless capabilities. On TheRake.com we’re lucky enough to stock all of the fundamental coats, ranging from the grandeur of the greatcoat to the loucheness of the belted coat.

According to Kit Blake Founder and Creative Director Chris Modoo: “If you think about classic overcoats, so many of them are double-breasted; the greatcoat, the peacoat, the Ulster coat, the polo coat... As well as the obvious benefit of having extra cloth to keep the wearer warm, they also have larger lapels that look great when ‘popped’. It’s no surprise that double-breasted coats have remained popular even in those periods when double-breasted suits and jackets were rarely seen.” Now one might think, that the double-breasted style is a gesture to officialism; contradicting the speed at which fashion is gearing towards casualisation and thus a design that takes you in the opposite direction. Before the Duke of Windsor came to worldwide prominence in the 1920s the double-breasted style was initially considered far too informal for dressy settings and was expressed as an act of rebelliousness. If there’s ever a time to channel your rapscallion side it is now. The double-breasted coat is there to break the rules and even if you feel its smartness is impeding your look, you can nonchalantly improvise on what you wear with it, for that informal appearance.

Contributor

Freddie Anderson

Published

November 2020

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